The Third Deadly Sin of ERP Implementation

#3: Excluding Critical Users from the Process

The IT department and the C-suite do not own (and may never interact with) your core business processes. So the project team should include key people – end users and functional managers – from across your organization who are regularly involved in those processes.

When the right people are involved from the beginning, you’re more likely to get hundreds of crucial decisions correct, you significantly improve the odds that your process changes are spot-on, and you help ensure the success of the implementation. Plus, you’ll have a group of employees who are engaged with the implementation process and who will have an investment in its success.

Failing to involve users can have a huge downside: Technology-only decisions that ignore the human element often result in the selection of an unsuitable solution, poor user buy-in, resistance to change, misdirected efforts and costly rework. The implementation of a solution that fixes little, breaks proven processes and creates new operational complications can have a devastating impact on an organization.
Engage stakeholders in ERP selection and in decisions – big, medium and small – that will affect the processes they use.

Engage stakeholders in ERP selection and in decisions – big, medium and small – that will affect the processes they use.

The 7 Deadly Sins of ERP Implementation

Some mistakes are just bad strategic or financial decisions. Some are the inevitable consequence of situational or organizational factors. Some, however, are the result of process-oriented or people-centric choices – and are easily avoided. These are The Seven Deadly Sins of ERP Implementation.

Marketing Content Manager at | Website | + posts

Tim is an expert IT services and software marketer, B2B marketing communications professional and content creator who brings more than 30 years of experience to the job.

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